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heard the word innovation, i have to put a plug in for tradition. i have a very traditional education. i spent a lot of years in silence speaking latin up in the hills, living within the medieval framework. i do respect the past. we study it. if you are grounded in tradition, you feel quite confident in change and innovation. if you are insecure, you are very reluctant to embrace the unknown. i do think we need to in our education and politics, we have to have a new appreciation for our traditions and the patterns that describe our culture and our being as americans. having said all that, we have saved in california tens of billions in energy efficiency. when i first adopted those, people reacted negatively. we pushed ahead. and now in california we have ab 32. signed by a republican actor turned governor. promoting something i pick up on and promote further. the number of people in silicon valley defended ab23 against -- ab32 against an onslaught of texas oil companies. we defend when they tried to block your business. california gets 50% of the venture capital. there is a lot going on
of some really first-rate cabinet meboses-starting with our attorney general, secretary of education, secretary of homeland security, secretary of health and human services, and we met with a range of 229 groups. representing a wide ranged perspective, from members of the law enforcement community, including many from your cities and states, to gun safety advocates, victims of the shootings, both down in virginia as well as out in colorado, sportsmens organization. hunters, gun owners, the nra. representatives of the video game and movie destroy. educators, retailers and public health officials. and as i said, i spoke to many of you in this room as well, along with the governors and the county executives. and no group was more consequential or instrumental in shaping of the document we put together for the president, than all of you in this room. to those conversations with you and other stakeholders, after literally hundreds of hours of work and research done by experts at the justice department and the department of homeland security and elsewhere, after reviewing just about every
starting with our attorney general come as secretary of education, secretary of homeland security, secretary of health and human services, kathleen sebelius. and we met with a range of 2200 -- 229 groups, representing a wide range of his crewmembers including many from new york, cities and states to gun safety advocates, victims of the shootings both down in virginia as well as in colorado. sportsmen's organization, hunters, gunowners. educators, retailers and public health officials. i spoke to many of the u.s. on as the governors and the county executive and no group is more consequential or incidental in shaping the document was put together for the president in this room. for those of you and other stakeholders after hundreds of hours of work and research done by experts in the justice department and department of homeland security and elsewhere come after every idea what that will make to gather dust on the shelves of some agency of government. a set of principles emerged that there is not universal agreement on, but overwhelming consensus and they were the foundation of the
% and it will essentially be cut close to happen the next decade. we are talking about education programs and health programs, including nih research. we are talking about infrastructure. we are talking about key domestic discretionary programs that are so important for the lives of the vast majority of the american people. as the president subsequently yesterday, the debt ceiling essentially must not be used as a weapon. it essentially takes on an is the basic full faith and credit of the united states of america. the president has made so clear what would be at stake if that were to happen. i just believe that it is so critical that that not occurred. you know, i have been through these battles for many decades. i don't remember anyone essentially saying we should go over the cliff. the consequences would be, i think, shamanic and potentially cataclysmic. for the republicans that say let's do it, i think i would be a mistake with foreseeable consequences. the federal reserve has said the responsible physician is we should not forget. >> the president says he's not going to talk about the debt ceil
the others. i mother was a special-education teacher. [cheers] my dad worked on the army base. my parents were crystal clear about what they wanted for us and that was an education. so a lot of what we did to give back was in the educational arena. i love that president obama house the same values. he knows that, for our nation, and education cannot be a luxury. it will strengthen the middle- class and strengthen the work force will keep some of davis -- that will keep us innovated. if you're thinking about how you can search or how you can follow the president's example to honor this national day of service, start with this. make a difference in one child's life. mentor a student. donated book to a library, doenitz applies to a neighborhood school. -- donate a book to a library, donate supplies to a school. i am here because i have someone looking out for me. i'm telling you how important my education was. someone was pushing me to succeed. but i want to make sure the next generation has that as well. so last year, when i launched the eva longoria foundation, i focused on helping advance
of the commission. >> president carter appointed you. >> carter appointed me when i left his education, running education. yet in the department of education and i went back to teaching at the appointed me to the commission. >> at what point to become the the u.s. civil rights commission will become a permanent agency? >> after the first year when the reports that they did -- with the commission did was instead of sitting down and saying, okay. we are here as a safety valve and don't really -- they did some hearings. major power that the commission has, and a point this out in the book. to me it is the most important thing about the commission. does what it is supposed to do it will go out and listen to people that nobody else will listen to. problems, civil rights problems that people had that they could not get anyone to pay attention, not just local people but the federal government. it would write letters, do all kinds. no one would pay any attention. the sole rights commission decided that first year it would go out and listen to these people and see what they had to say. they had the powe
, six teachers and educators were taken from us at gun point. an act of senseless and incomprehensible violence struck at the heart of our families, of our schools, of our communities across the country. earlier this month shortly after newtown, all members of congress took an oath to protect and defend the constitution and the american people. to protect and defend, that is our first responsibility. today leaders of the house democratic caucus have come together to fulfill that duty to confront the challenge of gun violence in our society to enact, to ensure the safety and security of our communities. under the leadership of congressman thomson, mike thompson, our gun violence prevention task force keeps growing in number. our colleagues are submitting recommendations for legislation, the task force is working with outside organizations, and sharing the latest information on gun violence and steps we can take and must take to end it. today to strengthen the efforts of this task force and our democratic caucus, we will hear from americans with personal and professional experiences with
apply it? how do we deliver band width that can change education, change health care, change all government services, we get faster, cheaper, better, the same phenomenon on our phones and in our networks, we want to see in public goods and services like education and health care. >> host: mr. levin, how important is speed when it comes to improving our economy? >> guest: depends on a variety of different uses. for example in medicine, we're now moving to a place where we can have wireless sensors improve medicine and that's great. but business uses and other thing things, cameras, geneomic medicine, there's faster networks, president clinton was was dell and he said we can't expect our businesses to compete internationally if they only have access the speed of korea, and he is absolutely right. >> reed hundt, energy is included in your book on technology. why? >> guest: to quote the smashing pumpkins, we all know what we're after, we just have to get there faster. we all know we need a clean energy economy, where it's really, really cheap to buy the energy and where the energy th
as a psychologist having problems with one of my troops i would try and educate them on some of the information and how a person who's suffering from ptsd might comport themselves in the challenges they would have specifically. by providing that information to the commanders that were ahead of the person in the unit, they were able to understand and maybe take a different factor towards helping the person. >> thank you. >> to have the senior flag officers testify of course and also waiting throughout the morning panel used to have a practice at the commission that the government witnesses would be on the first panel and they object to that inappropriate cases but the reason i'm pointing it out -- i will mention one other thing. the past few times we've invited someone from the department of justice the federal law mandates all federal agencies shall cooperate fully with the commission. they won't send to testify at any time in the past couple of years. so it kind of the allies at least one false myth and that is that the military doesn't take this issue very seriously. so after trying to compli
charts. now the way we are going, in terms of the percentage of g.d.p., what we spend on education, what we spend on health research, what we spend on so many necessary programs in this country is going to go down. the trend line is already there. what the republicans are essentially saying is to push it further. have further consequences in terms of health research. does that make sense? do the american people want that? the answer is no. we have to have balance. the problem within the republican conference of the house is there is too much imbalance. host: do you agree with this editorial -- guest: no one is suggesting relying only on taxation of the very wealthy. that is a sham target. no one is saying that. but let me point out, if we look at what has happened to middle-income families -- and i mentioned what is happening with the 401-k requirements, they're now dipping into their retirement on a massive basis. in 2010, the top 1% received over 90% of the income growth. that represents basically a very -- i represent basically a very middle-class district. i know the struggle to stay
, michigan also is diversifying, bringing in high-tech, various kinds of service, health care, education and so on. and places like university of michigan, ann arbor, are a tremendous resource for entrepreneurs, people trying to develop new high-tech business businesses. so it is a good sign to see that america still has a powerful industrial base but it is diversifying into a wide range of new types of industries. so it is a large and complex economy. i don't know if you want to talk about the broader economy or not, but you could come back to it if you like, but you know, we have been seeing some improvement in the labor market, it's still not we would like it to be. growth has been moderate. there are some positive signs to look at, and i think one of the key positives, i made reference to, is housing. as you know, house prices in the u.s. felt about 30% and the amount of construction felt extraordinary over this recession. and now for the first time, really since 2007, 2006, we are starting to see increases in production, house prices, that will affect household wealth. that's one po
't be where they are without having public education and building roads and everything. and you need to ask your g.o.p. where is yoush leader mitt romney. seems like he dropped out of sight. on the guns, i think they need to put inshunes on a gun like you do a car. host: so often we focus on the u.s. debt or deficit, we have exceeded now the dealt limit of $16.4 trillion. you can see in the upper left-hand side the debt clock. difficult choices on the debt if the u.s. think it's ceiling. the piece points out by mid february or early march the united states could face an unprecedented default unless it raises the debt ceiling. that was from tim geithner. further into the body of the "new york times" story i want to is share with you some of the numbers "the new york times" points out today. that could happen as early as february 15, if that happens by february 15 or early march, according to the by partisan policy center in analysis of what the government expects is $8 billion in revenue that day but it has $52 billion in spending that day, $6.8 billion in tax refunds, $3.5 in federal salari
and education and job training and science and medical research -- all the things that help us grow. now, step by step, we've made progress towards that goal. over the past two years, i've signed into law about $1.4 trillion in spending cuts. two weeks ago, i signed into law more than $600 billion in new revenue by making sure the wealthiest americans begin to pay their fair share. when you add the money that we'll save in interest payments on the debt, all together that adds up to a total of about $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction over the past two years -- not counting the $400 billion already saved from winding down the wars in iraq and afghanistan. so we've made progress. we are moving towards our ultimate goal of getting to a $4 trillion reduction. and there will be more deficit reduction when congress decides what to do about the $1.2 trillion in automatic spending cuts that have been pushed off until next month. the fact is, though, we can't finish the job of deficit reduction through spending cuts alone. the cuts we've already made to priorities other than medicare, medicaid, social s
. okay mr. willard? >> i would offer the question of education and trains as a potential lesson here is an excellent one. it is one of the significant lessons from fukushima. we frankly find that there very often training lessons learned from any number of occurrences throughout industry. in this particular case, when you think about the magnitude of the event and the situation that the operators at this particular nuclear site found themselves in, it was unpress kented in any of the education and training. i think one of the hess sons is to take that idea of a mag feud event that exceeds what we general design in to our sites and going both educate what defense and depth can really provide and train to the coping strategies in a situation like that that would be, you know, that may allow the level of resilience that may not have been designed in to site in the first place. it's just, you know, this was remarkable in the scope there were courageous operators that remain at the watch at the fukushima attempting to mitigate what happened to them. obviously, in retrospect additional edu
will essentially be cut close to have been the next decade. and so, we are talking about education programs. were talking about health programs, including nih research. were talking about infrastructure. we're talking that key domestic discretionary programs that are so important for the lives of the vast majority of the american people. so let me just say two things about that. number one, there has to be a balance. and number two, i think it is fido, as the president said so clearly yesterday, that the debt ceiling essentially must not use to say what then that essentially takes on and essentially undoes the basic full faith and credit of the united states of america. the president made so clear what would he have staked if that were to happen and i just think it's so critical that not occur. you know, i've been through these battles as i've said for many decades, but i don't remember anyone essentially saying we should go over the cliff in terms of the full faith and credit of the united states. the consequences with teeth, i think, to not take, potentially cataclysmic. and for the republicans
-poverty program would be jobs with a living age connected to quality education and decent housing. but it starts with poor and working poor people. think for example a wonderful piece in rolling stone, $34 billion for the top 18 banks in the last four years. $34 billion for the top 18 banks. we can take a slice of that and have tremendous impact in terms of alleviating poverty. not just give outs. we're talking about jobs with a living wage. building the roads, structure and so forth. >> jennifer: clearly if you build infrastructure and roads you have got jobs associated with it, in addition to making sure that people have access to those jobs. you have the opportunity to train people on how to have a long-term decent-paying job. >> that's right. >> jennifer: you have been critical of the president for his stand on a number of issues including what you have said is his silence on poverty. do you think he'll give it more attention in his second term. >> oh we're going to continue to put pressure on him. >> jennifer: no doubt. >> we're going to put the strong -- not just on th
on the entire education sector to negative. that includes every campus from harvard and yale to the college of girl's gone wild. muddies suggests they have to take actions to cut down the costs. >> thank you so much lauren. >>> coming up, speaking of school spending money wait until you hear where they are spending it the most. it's not on your kid's he had case. they didn't think the teachers were doing a good job so now the parents are taking over the schools. >> catch the flu from your cell phone? new studies show they are actually 10 times as dirty adds the toilet seat. they carry germs. wipe down your device once a week with a small amount offal pa hall based cleaner to avoid getting sick. exciting news for seaside heights new jersey the entire boardwalk will be rebuilt. the down awarded $3 million to help fund the restoration of the boardwalk. it was wiped out by super storm sandy last october. work is set to be done by may the 10 st. meaning the area is supposed to be ready for memorial day weekend. >> alex crawford has the latest. >> the afghan algeria forces have surrounded the are
interesting, and that's education. well-educated work force will be competitive across the world. that is the most critical investment. again, a role for the federal government, certainly a role for states and local governments, but a role for the american society that cannot be ignored. research education. and you drew it very, very correctly, and that is the manufacturing that comes from that. manufacturing matters, and how do you do? you need to be in front of it. and when you talk about the research and manufacturing technology, spot on. that is the third critical investment. the fourth one we talked about here, and that is infrastructure. these are four of the critical investments that we need to make as a society. some of that falls on individual companies encouraged by a research tax credit or encouraged by buy america in different ways, we encourage the tax policy. we did that. it was a democratic proposal. we did it three years ago and continued it and continued it in the recent fiscal cliff legislation where we provided 100% write-off for capital investment. that was fr
educational activities to visiting school groups during the summer months which is the only time outer island is actually open. the connecticut state university web site is clear that, quote, all schools and civic associations or other parties interested in participating in jealal activities on outer island, must, underline must, have prior approval. while the fish and wildlife service has no staff on outer island, the university uses interns to supervise the educational program. and occasional person may stop and have lunch. but if you want to visit, you must coordinate your visit with the university and not the fish and wildlife service. in addition, the university received a $250,000 grant from the long island sound fund. last friday, members of my staff met with representatives of the fish and wildlife service. the service has confirmed that they do not charge the university for what amounts to almost exclusive use of the island. furthermore, the service did not provide at any time, any analysis or breakdown on how they will spend $9.8 million of our taxpayer money. in fact, the only info
are going, in terms of the percentage of gdp, what we spend on education, what we spend on health research, what we spend on so many necessary programs in this country is going to go down. the trend line is already there. what the republicans are essentially saying is to push it further. have further consequences in terms of health research. does that make sense? do the american people want that? no. we have to have balance. the problem within the republican conference of the house is there is too much imbalance/ host: do you agree with this editorial -- guest: no one is suggesting relying only on taxation of the very wealthy. that is a sham target. no one is saying that. but let me point out, if we look at what has happened to middle- income families -- and i mentioned that there now dipping into their retirement on a massive basis. in 2010, the top 1% received over 90% of the income growth. that represents basically a very -- i represent basically a very middle-class district. i know the struggle to stay above water, in some cases. all we're asking for is balance. host: on the spending s
a kids' education depends on the educators and parents. >> sleepy 177 tweets the kids are just a number to the school district but the parents would have the best interest of the kids in mind. >>> before we go we want to welcome the newest member of the fox family, simon joy kelly, the new baby of ian kelly, born on saturday, january 12, a healthy 8 pounds and 4 ounces. >> you might think daddy ian would be sleeping now but of course he's going to be up with the new baby. everybody have a great day. "fox & friends" starts now. >>gretchen: good morning. today is thursday, january 17. i'm gretchen carlson. thanks for sharing your time today. americans held hostage by a one-eyed islamist jihaddist. the word this morning dozens of hostages just made a break for it. all right. >>steve: it was one of the most heartbreaking and inspirational stories we heard. a college football star overcoming the death of his grandmother and girlfriend who both died on the same day. as it turns out, the girlfriend never existed. she was a hoax. this story is going to have you talking all day. was the player i
of services, health care, education, and so on. places like the university of michigan, ann arbor, are a tremendous resource for entrepreneurs, people trying to develop new high-tech businesses. so it is a good sign to see that america still has a powerful industrial base, but it is diversifying into a wide range of new types of industries. so it is a large and complex economy. i don't know if you want to talk about the broader economy or not, but we can come back to it if you like. we have been seeing some improvement in the labor market. it is still not where we would like it to be. growth has been moderate. there are some positive signs to look at. one of the key positives that are already made reference to its housing. as you know, house prices in the u.s. fell 30% and the amount of construction fell extraordinarily over this recession. now for the first time really since 2007 or 2006 we are starting to see increases in production, rising house prices will affect household wealth. so that's one positive factor that will help us have a better year in 2013 and in 2014, i hope. i
? with an advanced degree in education from capella university, you'll have the knowledge to meet these challenges and make a difference in the lives of students. let's get started at capella.edu. i've always kept my eye on her... but with so much health care noise, i didn't always watch out for myself. with unitedhealthcare, i get personalized information and rewards for addressing my health risks. but she's still going to give me a heart attack. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. to the best vacation sp(all) the gulf! it doesn't matter which of our great states folks visit. mississippi, alabama, louisiana or florida, they're gonna love it. shaul, your alabama hospitality is incredible. thanks, karen. love your mississippi outdoors. i vote for your florida beaches, dawn. bill, this louisiana seafood is delicious. we're having such a great year on the gulf, we've decided to put aside our rivalry. now is the perfect time to visit anyone of our states. the beaches and waters couldn't be more beautiful. take a boat ride, go fishing or just lay in the sun. we've got coastline to explore and w
are declining education opportunities and a higher cost of living in california. fewer people are coming to the state, including undocumented workers. myers says the state needs all of them, including the dream act students. >> now they're going to say this. because without the immigrant kids, we would be in a deep hole. >> reporter: a worst case scenario, an eroding tax base. the government demanding more from lower income people. and the future of this baby, a potential revolt. >> this boat won't float if that continues. >> reporter: miriam hernandez, abc news, eyewitness news. >> that's pretty fascinating. you wouldn't think that. i mean, a lot of countries have problems with not having enough babies, but you wouldn't think the state of california. >> in 2011, the u.s. had 63 births per 1,000 women. compare that to the baby boom generation, 122 births of women of child-bearing ages, 15 to 44. >> are you going to do your part? you've got two. >> i might. i've always wanted four. >> you better get going. >> my husband counts so i have three. >>> it's one of the most heroic jobs in the w
educational protections and services including transportation to stay in the same school. public schools in new york, new jersey, connecticut are working tirelessly to support uninterrupted education of displaced children through the program. yet these schools face significant unexpected costs associated with the increased number of homeless students. congress has appropriated supplemental funds to help defer the costs associated with these increase -- these increases from past disasters. mr. chairman, if i might, give than the bill before us today does not contain direct funding for the program, is it your understanding that the intentions of the department of health and human services and the department of education work with the states of new york, new jersey, connecticut to assist the school districts affected by superstorm sandy, to access funds under the social services block grant to support the education of students displaced by the storm, including the transportation, counseling and supplies? i yield to the gentleman. mr. rogers: i thank the gentleman for yielding. yes. that is
since the heinous newtown atrocities that killed all the little baby angels and their educators. now the police chief in newtown is calling for an assault weapons ban. ann thompson has the latest from there. >> reporter: good evening, larry. there's a new organization called sandy hook promise. it is a group of residents including some parents and family members of victims who want commonsense solutions to prevent school shootings from happening again. this is a group that says it is nonpolitical. it is nonpartisan. and it doesn't have an agenda. other than to have a national discussion about what to do to keep these tragedies from happening again. they want to look at mental health issues. they want to look at the issue of violence. and they want to look at the issue of guns. in fact, they're not talking -- calling it gun control here. they call it gun responsibility. they want gun owners at the table. in fact, i talked to one of the founders tonight who said that he thinks the gun owners may be the key to solving this problem because they have the knowledge as to how to keep guns i
't got a clue and they actually support something they think is law. so the education part of it is one aspect of it. but you've also got the sheer power, the emotion of the 9/11 families style approach where you've got the sandy hook families coming in, it's very hard to oppose -- it's not about the president. you've got -- it's not even about bloomberg's money that's going to go into the advertising. the emotional force of the sandy hook families is just like it was with the 9/11 families. and republicans have got to face up to that. frankly, democrats have to face up and grow a spine here as well. they have run away from the gun debate for 20 years or so because it's helped them get into power in some states. >> by the way, there are 30 to 40 democrats in the house, too, will also fight any reasonable, rational reforms. you know, one of the moments yesterday, richard, that i thought was really telling, i thought one of the president's strongest moments is when he said if you have a congressman or congresswoman that supports assault weapons, ask them why. see, that's where the extremi
's presidency. i was listening to one of the speakers. they seem educated. it is imperative that obama touches on more than one issue, rather it is gun control, abortion, etc. in regard to gun control, i live in arizona now. there is not an issue with getting a gun. i do not understand why we are making an attempt to take guns post the newtown issue. if it is a thing of mental health, why are we not addressing that? ronald reagan closed all of the mental health institutions. why aren't we looking into reestablishing them? versus taking one of our basic civil liberties away. guest: absolutely a central aspect to this -- both parties agree in the case of these high- profile shootings that sometimes the problem is with the state of the shooter. we saw that in colorado. in and he, you look back on these instances and it turns out there were warning lines and that the mental health system, the educational system did not have any way of taking these people in and channeling them in some kind of help for themselves. how do you deal with that? how do you fund these programs? all of those are complicat
education, health care and government performance. so if you didn't get a copy when you came in, there are copies out in the hallway outside the auditorium. in this particular session, we're going to discuss how our political leaderrers can better -- leaders can better address the problems that we face. in particular we're going to look at ways that we can get congress, the white house and federal agencies to perform at a higher level. what are the new ideas to change the manner in which government functions? are there responsibilities that can be foreverred to other levels of -- transferred to other levels of government, the private sector or nongovernmental organizations? to help us understand the benefits and barriers to government performance, we have brought together an outstanding set of speakers. to my immediate right is phil knight who's the chairman and cofounder of nike incorp.ed. -- incorporated. in 1964 phil and his former university of oregon track coach, bill bowerman, founded what was then called blue ribbon sports which was later named nike after the greek winged
-standing commitment for education, and i know he recently took time out to do a town hall meeting for k-12 teachers. and so i'm particularly please today that joining us in the audience is an advanced placement economics class from chelsea high school. a special welcome to you. we're delighted to have you with us. a word about our format. for the first portion of our time, dr. bernanke will join me here on the stage in a conversation about a number of economic issues. for the rest of the time he has graciously agreed to take questions from the audience. and so around 4:30 our staff will be coming through the aisle to collect question cards from you. those of you who are watching online or even those of you in the audience are welcome to tweet your questions to us as well, using #fordschoolbernanke. professors kathryn dominguez and justin wolfers will collect question, along with two of our graduate students, david allen and curtis smith. and now it is my great pleasure and honor to welcome to the stage chairman ben bernanke. [applause] >> susan, before we get started i wanted to just take a minute
to extract drastic cuts in medicare, education and programs middle class families depend on. congress must pay its bills and pass a clean debt limit increase without further delay. he has said, the president remains committed to further reducing the deficit in a balanced way. so that is the response from the white house after the gop at its retreat in virginia came out with the possibility that perhaps we could extend the debt limit for another three months but the senate has to pass a budget, so the republicans which it has not done in four years. so. tracy: no surprise from the white us house. ashley: says no. tracy: okay, then. how about this. hank paulson says he hates the debt limit. you remember the former treasury secretary, the guy who said i need $700 billion right now? no wonder he hates it. ashley: don't we all. tracy: he has given a rare interview. we have details on that next. ashley: first a look at today's winners and losers. the dow just above the water mark. take a look. we'll be right back. ♪ chances are you've become, a better driver over the years. and one company thi
tock exchange, thank you. >>> the u.s. education department says it takes more than the standard four years for more than 20% of students to ini finish and get their deemployee mas. they credit the rise in graduation rate for the stiff competition for limited jobs. >>> an analysis of marrs' mclaughlin crater has scientists investigating new evidence that there was water on the red planet. using data from the mars reconnaissance orbiter, it may once have been a lake fed by an underground water supply. the findings are published in "nature geo science" and may push the search for ancient life on mars underground. >>> off-duty police officer in madrid is being credited as a hero this morning after rescuing a woman who fainted and fell on the city's subway tracks. the officer leaped into action and pulled the 52-year-old woman to safety. an oncoming train saw the trouble on the tracks and fortunately was able to stop in time. lucky day all right. it is now 7:12. let's go back to matt, savannah, and al. >> that's a nasty fall. natalie, thanks very much. here's the deal. you want to get the
of the country, this includes bringing in high tech services, health care, education and so on. places like the university of michigan in ann arbor are a tremendous resource and people trying to develop high-tech businesses so it is an opportunity to see that america has a powerful industrial base there are some positive things to look at. one of the key positives that i already made reference to his housing. as you know, house prices in the u.s. fell about 30% for the first time, since the 2007, 2006, we are starting to see increases in production and rising house prices and how that will affect household wealth. that is one positive factor that is going to help us out and help us to have a better year in 2013 and in 2014. a few other things that are positive is that state and local governments, which have been in contractionary mode because of the loss of everything. they wanted to check on the economy that they have been for the last two years. the energy industry is looking much stronger. consumers are more optimistic than the university of michigan publishes the index of consumer senti
an amendment to formally abolish slavery and it took the supreme court and the board of education vs. brown case to apolish jim crow, the tell-child of slavery. and a great stain on this country's history. thanks to roe v. wade, women have a fundamental right to make decisions about their own bodies, a right that continues to be threatened by this congress. and while the constitution grants great freedoms, the courts recognize that they come with reasonable limitations. the first amendment gives us freedom of speech but doesn't allow us to yell fire in a theater. and the second amendment, while it gives you the right to bear arms, has limitations as well. you can't carry a gun in an airplane or in a courtroom. and we need to remember that. so just reading the constitution is one thing but understanding is another. i hope we'll understand it and live it and see that we have a more perfect union. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from oregon seek recognition? without objection, the gentleman from
[ inaudible ] -- the nra proposed arming educators and volunteer security guards and private security personnel. this was a program that was funded to put actual police officers in schools after they received adequate training. there is a huge distinction to police officers who are wanted in a community, as opposed to being forced to have the police officers in their schools. it's based on a clinton era law. and they went on to say if you look at sheriff arpaio in arizona, he's talking about volunteer posses that a far cry from a trained officer, and also become really a part of the school staff and every single adult in the school building really becomes part of one team. [ applause ] >> stephanie: and as we pointed out, some of sheriff arpaio's posse, criminal backgrounds. [ bell chimes ] [ applause ] >> yeah, and police officers are trained to know when to shoot and when not to. >> stephanie: right. i was saying yesterday that -- talking about returning veterans. i'm just saying -- i think you have to think through a lot of it, because we have a lot of ptsd, be
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